Far Cry 5: Lost On Mars

I’m not sure I could, in good conscience, recommend anyone play through the Lost On Mars DLC for Far Cry 5 as it’s honestly quite a chore.

For reasons I can’t entirely fathom, just moving around is quite atrocious (something I’m not used to seeing in recent videogames). It’s not Driv3r levels of bad but it certainly does take a lot of patience to tolerate.

Rather unfortunately, it’s a pain compounded by also having to tolerate erstwhile Far Cry companion and all-round obnoxiously loud recurring character Hurk throughout. One of those characters that’s probably more enjoyable to write and perform than to have to endure, even when they’ve been dismembered, as is the case for this DLC.

However! It is an obscenely good looking thing. Pitched somewhere between Starship Troopers and prog rock album, it’s astoundingly beautiful.

There’s a real sense of fun to the art as the game takes place in what may as well be a quarry masquerading as Mars and recycles scenes from Far Cry 5 but now in traditional videogame floating-rock-dream areas to break up the monotony. Much like New Dawn later would put old work to a new, revitalised, purpose, the same can be said for Lost On Mars. But in space.

I’m not going to fib, I sat through the DLC from start to finish precisely because it’s so very up my street visually. I had great fun finding new corners of the map to take photos in, even when the game seemed determined to make that painful.

Whilst the best Far Cry In Space game remains The Signal From Tölva (I can’t believe I haven’t put proper words down about this yet!), I’m an absolute sucker for how Lost On Mars looks and would relish a full on proper Space! entry into the Far Cry universe.

But then again, there’s very few games I wouldn’t want a full on proper Space! variation of. I am me, after all.